Thursday, April 8, 2021

Customers urged to stay connected if they are behind on bills

We Energies is urging customers who are behind on their energy bills to contact us as soon as possible to avoid disconnection. 

Per the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin, the state’s residential disconnection moratorium will expire April 15. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have worked with our customers by offering enhanced payment plans and help with heating assistance. Because of our efforts, less than 1% of our customers are at risk for disconnection.




Disconnection is always a last resort

If you are behind on your bill, visit we-energies.com or call us at 800-842-4565. We are here to work with you to arrange a payment plan and connect you to financial assistance options. 

Energy assistance is available

Some customers may qualify for energy assistance through the Wisconsin Home Energy Assistance Program (WHEAP). In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, eligibility requirements have been adjusted to allow additional customers to receive heating and electric assistance quickly. 

Simple ways to manage costs

There are many ways to manage your energy costs at home. Visit our website for a handy checklist. 

As always, if you have questions about your bill or think you might have trouble paying, call us at 800-842-4565.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

We Energies employees surprise line mechanic intern injured in hit-and-run crash with heartwarming donation

When Dayce Woodard, a We Energies line mechanic intern, was seriously injured in a hit-and-run crash, his co-workers rallied to help him. Employee members of the American Association of Blacks in Energy started a fundraiser to help Dayce. In just a few weeks, generous We Energies employees had contributed more than $4,000. 

Dayce spent weeks in the hospital recovering from his injuries. His family was told at one point he might lose one of his legs. But he refused to give up and today he is back home and working to build up his strength. 

With his family’s help, a small group of employees gathered to surprise Dayce with the donations.  Jennifer Buchanan, internship program manager, presented Dayce with a Fitbit, a set of weights, an exercise step and a yearlong gym membership to help him continue his physical therapy. 

"We want to gift you with these items as motivation through your recovery so we can see you here soon," Buchanan said. Dayce was thrilled to be able to continue his strength training at home.

But Buchanan realized that Dayce’s mental health was just as important as his physical health. She managed to track down an elusive PlayStation 5 to brighten his spirits. When Dayce opened the gift, he was at a loss for words. 

WITI-TV (Fox6) was on hand to capture the surprise. 

Employees also raised enough money to give Dayce a $2,275 check to use toward vocational college. Dayce says he plans to pursue line mechanic training as soon as he is physically able.  

To provide some extra motivation, Buchanan framed a picture of Dayce climbing a pole during his internship. When Dayce saw it, he said: “I can’t wait to get back out there.” 

He has countless We Energies employees rooting for his success.

Friday, April 2, 2021

We Energies peregrine falcons welcome 12 early Easter eggs

Enjoy an early Easter egg hunt from the comfort of your couch by checking out our peregrine falcon nest box cameras! This year, there are a dozen eggs to be found at four nest boxes across Wisconsin. If conditions are just right, the first ‘peeps’ from newborn peregrine falcons could come in just a few weeks. 


Here’s an eggs-planation of the activity at each of our nest boxes: 

Oak Creek Power Plant 

Mom and dad, Essity and Michael, are incubating four eggs. 

Port Washington Generating Station 

Mom and dad, Brinn and Beasley, are incubating one egg so far, but more could arrive in the coming days. 

Valley Power Plant 

Dad and mom, Hercules and his unbanded female mate, are incubating three eggs. 

Weston Power Plant 

Mom and dad, Rosalee and Sheldon, are incubating four eggs at the nest box hosted by our sister company Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) in Rothschild. 

Hop on over to our high-definition nest box cameras to keep an eye out for the first signs of hatching. If everything goes well, we should see our first chicks before the end of the month. We’ll also be posting updates on Twitter and Facebook. 



Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and WPS are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-1990s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Monday, March 22, 2021

First peregrine falcon eggs of the season laid at We Energies nest boxes

It’s official — two pairs of our peregrine falcon parent pairs are now egg-specting! The first eggs of the 2021 nesting season were laid at the Oak Creek and Valley power plants over the weekend. 



Falcon mom and dad Essity and Michael were the first to welcome a new addition to their nest box in Oak Creek. Essity laid her first egg Saturday, March 20, the first day of spring, and her second early Monday morning.

At the Valley Power Plant in Milwaukee, Hercules and his mate, an unbanded female falcon, welcomed their first egg Sunday. Our peregrine falcon manager believes this is the same unbanded falcon who has been nesting at Valley since 2014. 

Now is the perfect time to tune in to our live nest box cameras. It’s only a matter of time before the arrival of more eggs.

Both sets of parents will take turns incubating their eggs over the coming weeks. If all goes well, we should see our first chicks in a little over a month. To learn more about the falcons at each nest box, check out this handy guide.

We’ll post all the egg-citing updates on Twitter and Facebook

Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-1990s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Thursday, March 18, 2021

They’re back! Peregrine falcons return to We Energies power plants

It’s a sure sign that spring is around the corner — peregrine falcons are back at We Energies power plants. Tune into our high-definition cameras 24/7 and watch as the raptors find love, lay eggs and raise their young.


This year, there are nest box cameras at three We Energies facilities, and we also have a camera at a Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) power plant: 

Oak Creek Power Plant

Port Washington Generating Station

Valley Power Plant in Milwaukee

Weston Power Plant in Rothschild

This is a great time to check in on the cameras throughout the day, because there should be quite a bit of activity over the next couple of weeks. Last year, the first eggs were laid around the end of March. 

If you need help identifying the falcons, our peregrine falcon manager has put together a handy guide for each nest site. You can also follow the We Energies Facebook page and Twitter feed for updates.

Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and WPS are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-’90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Where are they now?: Bucky

It’s time to jump around! In what has to be a good omen for Wisconsin Badgers fans, the peregrine falcon named “Bucky” has been spotted in Appleton. 

Bucky was one of four chicks born at the Port Washington Generating Station in May 2013. The very next year, the Badgers made it to the Final Four. (We’ll let you decide if that’s a coincidence.😉)

The now 7-year-old falcon has been recently spotted at the College Avenue Bridge in Appleton. Photographer Bruce Danz took this photo and kindly gave us permission to use it here. 

It’s always rewarding to see our peregrines doing well in the wild, but we never know when we’ll get lucky like this. Bucky left Port Washington eight years ago, and we hadn’t heard anything about him since! Danz was able to identify Bucky by the identification band we placed on his leg as a nestling.

Stay tuned for the start of the 2021 peregrine falcon nesting season later this month. If everything goes well, we’ll meet a brand-new class of chicks and watch them hatch, grow and fly away. 

Peregrine falcon program
We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Oak Creek Power Plant's fishing pier: a great place to drop a line

Oak Creek Power Plant's fishing pier extends into Lake Michigan to provide anglers a place to cast their lines. The pier is open daylight hours March 15 through Nov. 15 – weather permitting.

Although located on private We Energies property, the pier is open to the public for fishing and provides picnic tables, trash bins and access to a nearby public beach. Swimming, boat launching and fires are not allowed, but the beach welcomes walkers and dogs.



Al Kunda, maintenance planner – We Energies at the Oak Creek plant, uses Lake-Link’s Oak Creek Power Plant pier forum to update fishing enthusiasts on the pier’s status and closures. He noted the pier is subject to closures “at any time due to poor weather conditions, early snowfalls in fall, late snowfalls in spring and extreme high surf due to strong easterly winds,” making Lake-Link a good resource to check before taking up your tackle.

The Oak Creek Power Plant pier is a good spot to catch coho and chinook salmon, and brown, rainbow and lake trout, among other types of fish. The fish are attracted to the change in water current and the slightly elevated temperature of the water discharging from the power plant. On a clear day, fish can be seen swimming in the plant’s discharge channel.

Although we can’t promise a good catch, we can provide a scenic space to try your luck.

Please do your part to keep the space a health place for everyone by following the rules on posted signs.




To access the pier, take East Oakwood Road from South Howell Avenue, turn onto Fishing Pier Road and then take North Bowl Road to park.

Map to the fishing pier.


Fishing reports
Lake-Link
DNR (check Milwaukee South)


Sunday, March 7, 2021

‘I want that impact to be a positive one’: We Energies female employees share inspirational messages on International Women’s Day

It’s impossible to put into words the positive impact women have on our company and communities each day. From designing, engineering and repairing complicated energy systems to leading thousands of dedicated workers — female employees at We Energies are truly making a difference.

Each of these female leaders are an inspiration — but who inspires them?

In honor of International Women’s Day, we asked some of our female employees to share how women throughout history motivate them.

In a video posted on We Energies’ YouTube page , a diverse group of women throughout WEC Energy Group, the parent company of We Energies, reflect on powerful words spoken by trailblazers such as Maya Angelou, Serena Williams and Ruth Bader Ginsberg. More than a dozen women, from young professionals to senior company leaders, are featured, each highlighting the many roles the company depends on each day to provide customers with safe and reliable energy.

“Every decision, every change, big or small, has an impact on the people around me,” said Elizabeth Jost, director — gas operations for We Energies. “And I want that impact to be a positive one.”

WEC Energy Group is dedicated to ensuring a diverse workforce and an inclusive workplace. Nearly 2,000 women work throughout the company, many in leadership positions. The company actively supports diversity and inclusion in part by promoting its eight business resource groups, including its Women’s Development Network, to all employees.

WEC Energy Group and its subsidiaries have received local and national awards for their commitment to a diverse workforce. We Energies was recently named as a Diversity in Business Award recipient by the Milwaukee Business Journal. Nationally, WEC Energy Group was recognized in 2019 as one of Forbes’ Best Employers for Diversity, and as one of Newsweek’s Most Responsible Companies for 2021.

Thursday, March 4, 2021

Where are they now?: The Beak Freak

Like his namesake, “The Beak Freak” is in midseason form. The peregrine falcon, named after Giannis “The Greek Freak” Antetokounmpo, has been spotted in Jefferson, Wisconsin. 

You may remember The Beak Freak was born in May 2019 at the Oak Creek Power Plant and named after the Bucks MVP by fans as part of our sports legends naming contest.



After The Beak Freak left the nest, we didn’t know if we’d ever see him again. But in October, Matt Hill captured the tell-tale band on The Beak Freak’s leg from the nest box webcam at the Valero Renewables nest site in Jefferson. Matt kindly granted us permission to use his image here.


We’re thrilled to see him making his way in the world a year and a half later. 
Stay tuned for the start of the 2021 peregrine falcon nesting season coming later this month. If everything goes well, we’ll meet a brand-new class of chicks and watch them hatch, grow and fly away. 

Peregrine falcon program
We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.
Since our first successful nest in the mid-90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Thursday, February 25, 2021

Where are they now?: Yeli

His namesake spent a lot of time in Miller Park, so it makes sense that “Yeli” the peregrine falcon would be drawn to another facility formerly known as Miller. He was spotted this summer on the nest box webcam at Molson Coors.

Yeli was one of two chicks born at Valley Power Plant in Milwaukee in May 2019. Our customers voted to name him after the Milwaukee Brewers MVP Christian Yelich in our sports legends naming contest.



Emily Harrison at Molson Coors was able to grab this screenshot of Yeli at the company’s nest site back in August and granted us permission to include it here. We were able to identify Yeli thanks to the identification band we attached to his leg when he was a nestling. 




This is the first sighting of Yeli since he left the nest. We love to see our young peregrines finding their way in the world. 

Stay tuned for the start of the 2021 peregrine falcon nesting season, coming in March. If everything goes well, we’ll meet a brand-new class of chicks and watch them hatch, grow and fly away. 

Peregrine falcon program
We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.
Since our first successful nest in the mid-‘90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Prevent natural gas meter damage during warm up

The warmer temperatures this week are a nice break from the bitter cold, but they could present a dangerous situation to the natural gas equipment on your home.

Melting snow and ice can slide off your roof and damage your natural gas meter, which can cause a loss of service or a gas leak. Use recommended tools, such as a roof rake, to remove snow buildup on your roof to help prevent this damage from happening.

Icicles pose another problem. When the temperatures are mild, icicles start dripping. A wet natural gas meter isn’t a problem, but an ice covered one is — and that’s what happens when the temperature drops again.




To avoid problems: 

·         Remove snow from areas above natural gas equipment.

·         Remove icicles that may drip water onto the meter. 

·         Don’t kick or hit the meter to break away built-up snow or ice. 

·         Use a broom to gently brush snow and melted ice off the meter. 

If you smell a natural gas odor, leave the house immediately and call our natural gas emergency number at 800-261-5325.

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Where are they now?: Tundra

She was named after wild Wisconsin winters, but this Tundra can be tamed — or at least, caught. The young peregrine falcon named “Tundra” was captured and released at the Cedar Grove Ornithological Research Station (CGORS) this fall. 

Tundra was one of two chicks born at the Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) Weston Power Plant in Rothschild in May 2020. Our customers voted to name her and her brother, Kringle, after some of our favorite things about Wisconsin



Nadia Swanson, a volunteer at CGORS, took this photo of Tundra with Master Bander Tom Meyer in October. CGORS, established in the 1930s, traps and bands migrating raptors each fall and collects long-term population data. After each bird is banded, it is safely released back into the wild. This image is included with Nadia’s permission.

After our peregrine falcon chicks fly the nest, we never know if we’ll see them again. Sightings like this one are made possible by the small identification bands we attach to the falcons’ legs while they are still nestlings.

Hopefully the next time someone is able to ID Tundra, it will be at a nest site of her own.

Stay tuned for the start of the 2021 peregrine falcon nesting season, coming in March. If everything goes well, we’ll meet a brand-new class of chicks and watch them hatch, grow and fly away. 

Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-’90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Friday, February 12, 2021

Love is in the air, but balloons shouldn't be

Balloons make for a great Valentine’s Day gift, but if you’re not careful, they can leave you and thousands of others in the dark.

Over 20,000 We Energies customers lost power in 2020 due to balloons contacting our power lines and other equipment. Love may not be a science, but delivering energy is —Mylar balloons that come into contact with power lines act as a conductor, creating a short circuit.

Not only can balloons knock out power, the short circuit from the balloon also can cause power lines to fall to the ground, creating a dangerous situation.




Need an alternative idea to celebrate safely this Valentine’s Day? Here are some ideas:

Assemble an emergency kit together. Nothing says romance more than being prepared for power outages. Throw in a blanket, flashlight and some battery-powered chargers for your cellphones.

• Cook a simple meal together. Microwaves and slow cookers use less energy than an oven. But if you need to heat things up in the oven, stay efficient by using the oven light and not opening the door to check on your romantic dinner.

• Snuggle safely together. When you’re done using your electric blanket, turn it off to reduce the risk of fire.

• Start a fire together, but don’t forget to open a window. Open-hearth fireplaces draw hot air from your home, sending it up the chimney. Cracking open a nearby window reduces the air drawn into the fireplace and improves efficiency by up to 20%.

• Buy a carbon monoxide (CO) detector together. The risk of CO poisoning is greater during the winter months. Stay safe and install a CO detector.

• Focus on Energy together. Check out our partners at Focus on Energy for instant discounts on energy-efficient products like LED bulbs, smart thermostats and power strips. You may even qualify for a free energy-saving kit.

Thursday, February 11, 2021

Where are they now?: Cream Puff

She captured our hearts when she was born last spring, and now, she’s been captured on camera. The peregrine falcon named “Cream Puff” was recently spotted at a nest site at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. 

Cream Puff was one of three chicks who hatched at the Oak Creek Power Plant nest box in May 2020. Voters from across the state named Cream Puff and her siblings after some of our favorite things about Wisconsin



Cream Puff was last seen flying away in the spring. Many times, those last flights are the final time we see the falcons, but our peregrine falcon manager’s eagle eye recently spotted Cream Puff on the UW-Oshkosh nest box webcam. He was able to identify her using the band we attached to her leg last spring.

Birders can read the identification bands through binoculars or discover them in photos they take and let us know if they spot one of our falcons out in the wild. It’s always rewarding to see our young peregrines finding their way in the world. 

Stay tuned for the start of the 2021 peregrine falcon nesting season, coming in March. If everything goes well, we’ll meet a brand-new class of chicks and watch them hatch, grow and fly away. 

Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Friday, February 5, 2021

Earn an MVP with our energy-saving playbook

Watching the big game this weekend? Our game plan will help customers use energy efficiently with simple plays that can score big savings.
  


Run a reverse on your thermostat

No need to get overheated celebrating every big play. Stay comfortable by turning down your thermostat. Set it to 68 degrees to keep your home warm and manage heating costs. When leaving home or going to bed, set the thermostat back 7-10 degrees, so your furnace isn’t running when no one is around.

Create home-field advantage with fans

Ceiling fans play both offense and defense, cooling in the summer and circulating warm air during the winter. In the winter, run your ceiling fan clockwise on the lowest setting. This pushes warm air down to prevent the thermostat from going up.

Use star-studded devices to counter power drain

Sack wasted power by unplugging devices you’re not using or getting a smart power strip. Energy-sucking devices like video game consoles and coffee makers can increase your monthly bill. Also, if you’re buying a new television, look for an Energy Star model. They use 25% less energy than traditional televisions. 

Call an audible and use the microwave

Microwaves and slow cookers use less energy than an oven, making them great options to warm up small snacks or dishes. If using the oven is best, stay efficient by using the oven light, not opening the door, to check on your gridiron grub.

See other trick plays to run to manage your energy costs on our website.

Thursday, February 4, 2021

Keep your family safe with these cold weather tips

With bitter cold temperatures in the forecast, we are encouraging customers to take some simple steps to keep safe and warm.

Be prepared: We have one of the most reliable power grids in the country, but outages in extreme weather can happen. Be prepared for winter power outages by assembling an emergency kit with blankets, flashlights and battery-powered chargers for your cellphones. Also, bookmark we-energies.com on your phone’s web browser to report an outage and get updates on restoration.

Space heater safety: If you plan to use a space heater, do so safely. Only use newer models with safety features like automatic shut-off. Plug the heater directly into the wall. Don’t use extension cords or power strips. Place the heater on a flat surface away from children and pets, and keep it at least 6 feet away from flammable materials like drapes or blankets.

Safe sleeping: Do not take risks with your electric blanket. When you’re not using your blanket, turn it off to reduce the risk of fire. Keep pets away from electric blankets, as their teeth and claws can puncture wire insulation and cause damage.

Prevent carbon monoxide dangers: The risk of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is greater during the winter months. Stay safe by installing a CO detector, clearing heating vents of any snow and ice, and learning the symptoms of CO poisoning.

Prevent furnace issues: Have your furnace inspected by a qualified technician once a year, and clean or replace furnace filters as needed. If your furnace stops running, contact a qualified heating contractor.

Keep clutter away from furnace: Keep the area around the furnace and water heater free of clutter. Never store flammable liquids near those areas. Taking these steps can help reduce the risk of fire and damage to the furnace.

Oven safety: Never use a stove or oven to heat your home. Not only is it inefficient, it could lead to CO poisoning.

Let the sun in: Open the curtains when the sun is out and use the sunlight to help warm your home. Close curtains on windows that don’t face the sun. Close all curtains at night to help retain heat and cut down on drafts from windows.


Thursday, January 21, 2021

Earn an MVP with our energy-saving playbook while you back the Pack

As we cheer the Green and Gold toward another title, we can be champions at home, too. Our game plan will help customers use energy efficiently with simple plays that can score big savings.



Run a reverse on your thermostat

No need to get overheated celebrating every big play. Stay comfortable by turning down your thermostat. Set it to 68 degrees to keep your home warm and manage heating costs. When leaving home or going to bed, set the thermostat back 7-10 degrees, so your furnace isn’t running when no one is around.

Create home-field advantage with fans

Ceiling fans play both offense and defense, cooling in the summer and circulating warm air during the winter. In the winter, run your ceiling fan clockwise on the lowest setting. This pushes warm air down to prevent the thermostat from going up.

Use star-studded devices to counter power drain

Sack wasted power by unplugging devices you’re not using or getting a smart power strip. Energy-sucking devices like video game consoles and coffee makers can increase your monthly bill. Also, if you’re buying a new television, look for an Energy Star model. They use 25% less energy than traditional televisions. 

Call an audible and use the microwave

Microwaves and slow cookers use less energy than an oven, making them great options to warm up small snacks or dishes. If using the oven is best, stay efficient by using the oven light, not opening the door, to check on your gridiron grub.

See other trick plays to run to manage your energy costs on our website.

Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Control your energy costs no matter what winter brings

Wisconsin  winters can be brutal. That’s why we’re sharing these no- and low-cost tips to help you manage your energy costs all season long — no matter how low those wind chills may get.



No cost

Dial it down: Lower your thermostat when you’re asleep or away. Even a few degrees can make a big difference. 

Let the sunshine in: Open your shades, blinds and drapes during the day to let in the warmth of the sun. Close them at night to keep the warm air in.

Check your water heater: If it’s set higher than 120 degrees F, you’re likely using more energy than you need to wash your hands, clean dishes and wash your clothes. 

Put your ceiling fan to work: Run your ceiling fan clockwise at the lowest speed. This moves the warmer air trapped near the ceiling down and around the room. 


Low cost

Cover drafty windows: Use a heavy-duty, clear plastic sheet on a frame or tape clear plastic film to the inside of your window frames during the cold winter months. Make sure the plastic is sealed tightly to the frame.

Seal cracks and gaps: Don’t let cold air creep in through poorly sealed windows or doors. Use caulk or weatherstripping to stay comfortable.

Replace your furnace filter: Dirty filters reduce airflow and make your furnace use more energy. Replace it monthly during the heating season, or buy a high-efficiency filter than can last several months.

Focus on Energy: Check out our partners at Focus on Energy for instant discounts on energy-efficient products like LED bulbs, smart thermostats and power strips. You may even qualify for a free energy-saving kit!

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Keep your family safe with these cold weather tips

Winter can be a wonderful time to get outside and enjoy the snow or hibernate indoors, but the cold temperatures can also pose some problems. Use these winter tips to be prepared and to keep yourself and your family safe and warm.












Be prepared: Be prepared for winter power outages by assembling an emergency kit with blankets, flashlights and battery-powered chargers for your cellphones. Save our number to your phone to call if your power goes out: 800-261-5325. 

Keep meters clear: Wipe away winter hazards by keeping meters and vents free from snow and ice. Clear away snow using your hands or a broom — never use a shovel or other sharp object. Remove icicles and snow hanging above the meter, and use caution when shoveling or using a snowblower near the meter.

Space heater safety: If you plan to use a space heater, do so safely. Only use newer models with safety features like automatic shut-off. Place heater on a flat surface away from children and pets. Avoid using extension cords, and keep the heater at least 6 feet away from combustible materials like drapes or blankets.

Safe sleeping: Do not take risks with your electric blanket. When you’re not using your blanket, turn it off to reduce the risk of fire. Keep pets away from electric blankets, as their teeth and claws can puncture wire insulation and cause damage.

Prevent carbon monoxide dangers: The risk of carbon monoxide poisoning is greater during the winter months. Be prepared and stay safe by installing a carbon monoxide detector, checking heating vents for blockages and learning the symptoms of CO poisoning.

Prevent furnace issues: Have your furnace inspected by a qualified technician and clean or replace furnace filters as needed. 

Keep clutter away from furnace: Keep the area around the furnace and water heater free of clutter, and never store flammable liquids near those areas. Taking these steps can help reduce the risk of fire and damage to the furnace.

Oven safety: Never use a stove or oven to heat your home. Make sure the burner flame on your stove is blue. A yellow flame may indicate the need for an adjustment.