Thursday, April 8, 2021

Customers urged to stay connected if they are behind on bills

We Energies is urging customers who are behind on their energy bills to contact us as soon as possible to avoid disconnection. 

Per the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin, the state’s residential disconnection moratorium will expire April 15. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have worked with our customers by offering enhanced payment plans and help with heating assistance. Because of our efforts, less than 1% of our customers are at risk for disconnection.




Disconnection is always a last resort

If you are behind on your bill, visit we-energies.com or call us at 800-842-4565. We are here to work with you to arrange a payment plan and connect you to financial assistance options. 

Energy assistance is available

Some customers may qualify for energy assistance through the Wisconsin Home Energy Assistance Program (WHEAP). In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, eligibility requirements have been adjusted to allow additional customers to receive heating and electric assistance quickly. 

Simple ways to manage costs

There are many ways to manage your energy costs at home. Visit our website for a handy checklist. 

As always, if you have questions about your bill or think you might have trouble paying, call us at 800-842-4565.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

We Energies employees surprise line mechanic intern injured in hit-and-run crash with heartwarming donation

When Dayce Woodard, a We Energies line mechanic intern, was seriously injured in a hit-and-run crash, his co-workers rallied to help him. Employee members of the American Association of Blacks in Energy started a fundraiser to help Dayce. In just a few weeks, generous We Energies employees had contributed more than $4,000. 

Dayce spent weeks in the hospital recovering from his injuries. His family was told at one point he might lose one of his legs. But he refused to give up and today he is back home and working to build up his strength. 

With his family’s help, a small group of employees gathered to surprise Dayce with the donations.  Jennifer Buchanan, internship program manager, presented Dayce with a Fitbit, a set of weights, an exercise step and a yearlong gym membership to help him continue his physical therapy. 

"We want to gift you with these items as motivation through your recovery so we can see you here soon," Buchanan said. Dayce was thrilled to be able to continue his strength training at home.

But Buchanan realized that Dayce’s mental health was just as important as his physical health. She managed to track down an elusive PlayStation 5 to brighten his spirits. When Dayce opened the gift, he was at a loss for words. 

WITI-TV (Fox6) was on hand to capture the surprise. 

Employees also raised enough money to give Dayce a $2,275 check to use toward vocational college. Dayce says he plans to pursue line mechanic training as soon as he is physically able.  

To provide some extra motivation, Buchanan framed a picture of Dayce climbing a pole during his internship. When Dayce saw it, he said: “I can’t wait to get back out there.” 

He has countless We Energies employees rooting for his success.

Friday, April 2, 2021

We Energies peregrine falcons welcome 12 early Easter eggs

Enjoy an early Easter egg hunt from the comfort of your couch by checking out our peregrine falcon nest box cameras! This year, there are a dozen eggs to be found at four nest boxes across Wisconsin. If conditions are just right, the first ‘peeps’ from newborn peregrine falcons could come in just a few weeks. 


Here’s an eggs-planation of the activity at each of our nest boxes: 

Oak Creek Power Plant 

Mom and dad, Essity and Michael, are incubating four eggs. 

Port Washington Generating Station 

Mom and dad, Brinn and Beasley, are incubating one egg so far, but more could arrive in the coming days. 

Valley Power Plant 

Dad and mom, Hercules and his unbanded female mate, are incubating three eggs. 

Weston Power Plant 

Mom and dad, Rosalee and Sheldon, are incubating four eggs at the nest box hosted by our sister company Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) in Rothschild. 

Hop on over to our high-definition nest box cameras to keep an eye out for the first signs of hatching. If everything goes well, we should see our first chicks before the end of the month. We’ll also be posting updates on Twitter and Facebook. 



Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and WPS are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-1990s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Monday, March 22, 2021

First peregrine falcon eggs of the season laid at We Energies nest boxes

It’s official — two pairs of our peregrine falcon parent pairs are now egg-specting! The first eggs of the 2021 nesting season were laid at the Oak Creek and Valley power plants over the weekend. 



Falcon mom and dad Essity and Michael were the first to welcome a new addition to their nest box in Oak Creek. Essity laid her first egg Saturday, March 20, the first day of spring, and her second early Monday morning.

At the Valley Power Plant in Milwaukee, Hercules and his mate, an unbanded female falcon, welcomed their first egg Sunday. Our peregrine falcon manager believes this is the same unbanded falcon who has been nesting at Valley since 2014. 

Now is the perfect time to tune in to our live nest box cameras. It’s only a matter of time before the arrival of more eggs.

Both sets of parents will take turns incubating their eggs over the coming weeks. If all goes well, we should see our first chicks in a little over a month. To learn more about the falcons at each nest box, check out this handy guide.

We’ll post all the egg-citing updates on Twitter and Facebook

Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-1990s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Thursday, March 18, 2021

They’re back! Peregrine falcons return to We Energies power plants

It’s a sure sign that spring is around the corner — peregrine falcons are back at We Energies power plants. Tune into our high-definition cameras 24/7 and watch as the raptors find love, lay eggs and raise their young.


This year, there are nest box cameras at three We Energies facilities, and we also have a camera at a Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) power plant: 

Oak Creek Power Plant

Port Washington Generating Station

Valley Power Plant in Milwaukee

Weston Power Plant in Rothschild

This is a great time to check in on the cameras throughout the day, because there should be quite a bit of activity over the next couple of weeks. Last year, the first eggs were laid around the end of March. 

If you need help identifying the falcons, our peregrine falcon manager has put together a handy guide for each nest site. You can also follow the We Energies Facebook page and Twitter feed for updates.

Peregrine falcon program

We Energies and WPS are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-’90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Where are they now?: Bucky

It’s time to jump around! In what has to be a good omen for Wisconsin Badgers fans, the peregrine falcon named “Bucky” has been spotted in Appleton. 

Bucky was one of four chicks born at the Port Washington Generating Station in May 2013. The very next year, the Badgers made it to the Final Four. (We’ll let you decide if that’s a coincidence.😉)

The now 7-year-old falcon has been recently spotted at the College Avenue Bridge in Appleton. Photographer Bruce Danz took this photo and kindly gave us permission to use it here. 

It’s always rewarding to see our peregrines doing well in the wild, but we never know when we’ll get lucky like this. Bucky left Port Washington eight years ago, and we hadn’t heard anything about him since! Danz was able to identify Bucky by the identification band we placed on his leg as a nestling.

Stay tuned for the start of the 2021 peregrine falcon nesting season later this month. If everything goes well, we’ll meet a brand-new class of chicks and watch them hatch, grow and fly away. 

Peregrine falcon program
We Energies and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are honored to be a part of a statewide effort to restore the peregrine falcon population. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources added peregrine falcons to the state’s endangered species list in the 1970s.

Since our first successful nest in the mid-90s, 410 peregrine falcons have hatched at our facilities. The falcons are drawn to tall structures along Lake Michigan or major rivers, which make many of the We Energies and WPS facilities ideal nesting sites.

This program is another way We Energies and WPS are building a bright, sustainable future. From helping endangered animals and restoring natural habitats, to building new solar facilities and reducing carbon emissions, we are committed to a cleaner future.

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Oak Creek Power Plant's fishing pier: a great place to drop a line

Oak Creek Power Plant's fishing pier extends into Lake Michigan to provide anglers a place to cast their lines. The pier is open daylight hours March 15 through Nov. 15 – weather permitting.

Although located on private We Energies property, the pier is open to the public for fishing and provides picnic tables, trash bins and access to a nearby public beach. Swimming, boat launching and fires are not allowed, but the beach welcomes walkers and dogs.



Al Kunda, maintenance planner – We Energies at the Oak Creek plant, uses Lake-Link’s Oak Creek Power Plant pier forum to update fishing enthusiasts on the pier’s status and closures. He noted the pier is subject to closures “at any time due to poor weather conditions, early snowfalls in fall, late snowfalls in spring and extreme high surf due to strong easterly winds,” making Lake-Link a good resource to check before taking up your tackle.

The Oak Creek Power Plant pier is a good spot to catch coho and chinook salmon, and brown, rainbow and lake trout, among other types of fish. The fish are attracted to the change in water current and the slightly elevated temperature of the water discharging from the power plant. On a clear day, fish can be seen swimming in the plant’s discharge channel.

Although we can’t promise a good catch, we can provide a scenic space to try your luck.

Please do your part to keep the space a health place for everyone by following the rules on posted signs.




To access the pier, take East Oakwood Road from South Howell Avenue, turn onto Fishing Pier Road and then take North Bowl Road to park.

Map to the fishing pier.


Fishing reports
Lake-Link
DNR (check Milwaukee South)